living in malaysia

Is the MM2H visa worth considering after all the new taxes?

In the latest budget the government is apparently only allowing foreigners to buy properties in excess of RM1m, or houses in excess of RM2m.  So if you just want to rent, then it doesn’t affect you.  From memory,  Japanese and English people are the two nationalities who have taken up more MM2H visas than others.  Japanese mostly rent, so it is no problem for them. But many of us (English) prefer to buy so we can renovate the property to suit our own taste and convenience, and at these prices, many other countries’ property prices are more attractive.

In addition the Penang government wishes to impose a surcharge of 3% on foreigners’ property purchases.

Then the federal government wishes to impose draconian capital gains taxes, making it uneconomic to move, as if your property has increased in value, then so have others, but you lose a large chunk in CGT, so need extra money to cover the increase on the new property you wish to purchase. The most economic place to move is out of the country.

So, they prefer foreigners not to buy property now? Before they wanted us to buy property.

Certainly, we spent a lot of money and employed a lot of people renovating our property.   That was a big contribution to the local economy.  Had we continued to rent, then they wouldn’t have had this input.  And living here we contribute to the local economy, by patronising the local businesses.

Thus, if you already own a property and do not wish to move, or are happy to rent, then MM2H will work for you still. Otherwise… Germany, Malta, Turkey, Thailand, Panama, Ecuador, Uruguay are a few countries you could investigate where you can buy cheaper property and have a nice environment.

But the government changes requirements for the MM2H visa every three months or so, so they may decide these new impositions do not apply to MM2H holders.  We shall wait and see.

And then the awful GST is coming soon…

A little more information here.

All this is a pity, because Penang has greatly improved since we first moved here six years ago, and looks like a lot more improvements are coming.

Retirement to Penang – could I afford not to? May 2013 update.

UPDATE MAY 2013

Research by Bacs Family Finance Tracker claims household bills in Britain have increased by 40 % since 2007. Well, I retired in mid-2007, and moved to Penang in May 2008. Just one more reason for my thinking below.

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Living and working in London:

40% marginal income tax – perhaps comes to 25% of income; 20% VAT; council tax, petrol tax, energy taxes, water costing £70 per month, the cost of getting to and from work, cost of dressing for work, mortgage and interest… So the government takes most of the money, and then the banks and privatised money-gouging utilities get most of the rest…

…leaving just enough to live and have a holiday in the sun every year.

The only “saving” possible was paying the mortgage, but much of that was siphoned off by the bank as interest.

The cost of working was so high that it didn’t seem worth it. Basically I was working to survive in order to work. OK, I did enjoy my work, until near the end, but that is not the point.

Just the annual council tax alone in London can be the equivalent of three months living cost in Malaysia.

It’s almost as if it’s cheaper to retire abroad than to work and live in London. If you have equity in your property and you sell it, you can buy a nicer property abroad more cheaply, and then live on the difference for many years.

Well now I’ll be off to the cinema, where a ticket for the latest film will cost me £1.80.

Retirement – could I afford not to?

Living and working in London:

40% marginal income tax – perhaps comes to 25% of income; 20% VAT; council tax, petrol tax, energy taxes, water costing £70 per month, the cost of getting to and from work, cost of dressing for work, mortgage and interest… So the government takes most of the money, and then the banks and privatised money-gouging utilities get most of the rest…

…leaving just enough to live and have a holiday in the sun every year.

The only “saving” possible was paying the mortgage, but much of that was syphoned off by the bank as interest.

The cost of working was so high that it didn’t seem worth it. Basically I was working to survive in order to work. OK, I did enjoy my work, until near the end, but that is not the point.

Just the annual council tax alone in London can be the equivalent of three months living cost in Malaysia.

It’s almost as if it’s cheaper to retire abroad than to work and live in London. If you have equity in your property and you sell it, you can buy a nicer property abroad more cheaply, and then live on the difference for many years.

Langkawi – December 2012. Holidaying here. Retiring here?

One Malay word you should know if you are in Langkawi – “Pantai” = “Beach”.

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Tanjong Rhu beach – in the north of Langkawi

I wrote a blog about Langkawi after my visit in April 2012, and I have just returned from my third holiday in Langkawi in about four years. I will combine my previous blog with this, adding more information. The smaller photos are from April 2012, the larger from December 2012 – so you can tell

GETTING THERE

  • In August 2008 we drove up to Kuala Perlis and caught the ferry over to the main ferry terminal in Langkawi.  All we had to do was phone a contact who ran a parking lot, give an approximate arrival time, and he bought the ferry tickets.  When we arrived we could park undercover and he gave us the tickets, and pointed out where to catch the ferry.
  • In April we flew on Air Asia from Penang to Langkawi, which is about 25 minutes in the air, but from when we left home by taxi to when we were in our hotel room about four hours had elapsed.  Which was about the same amount of time as driving and catching the ferry, although the flight was less strenuous.

http://tropicalexpat.com/retire-in-langkawi/

In Malaysia my notebook PC overheats

In Malaysia we’ve found our notebook PC’s suffer from the heat.  They freeze ,crash, or the keyboard goes haywire. Or all three. They sell stands with a built-in fan, on which to sit notebooks, , but they are not effective.  The best is to use a mini fan, or even full size fan, pointed at the computer, while elevating the notebook.

Mini fan and notebook slightly elevated by plastic on right, so airflow from fan goes underneath, and onto keyboard.

I bought the mini fan from Swiss Com in First Avenue IT area.  That is, near Komtar and Prangin Mall.  Perhaps it cost around RM40, but added two years to the life of my notebook.